Flint Juventino Beppe | The FJB Fingerprint 


Flute Mystery Op.66


Digging Deeper

  

Alto Flute, Harp and String Orchestra (Op.66a)
C Flute, Harp and String Orchestra (Op.66b)
Piano reduction (Op.66c)

Dedicated to — and premiered by — Sir James Galway
 
 


Aside from being the album title of the Grammy-nominated album FLUTE MYSTERY, Flute Mystery Op.66b is a symphonic poem for transverse flute, harp and orchestra. Op.66 comes in a version for Alto Flute (Op.66a), C Flute (Op.66b) and Piano Reduction (Op.66c).

It is a melodic anchored composition; on the surface appealing and relaxing, but at the same time dynamic, complex and with many hidden layers.

The composition is dedicated to the flautist Sir James Galway, and the original version for Alto Flute had its world premiere at the Kennedy Center, Washington D.C., in 2006 by Galway and National Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leonard Slatkin.

The C Flute version was first performed at St. John's Smith Square, London, in 2009 by Emily Beynon (flute), Catherine Beynon (harp) and Philharmonia Orchestra, conducted by Vladimir Ashkenazy: The C Flute version is also available on the album FLUTE MYSTERY (2L), performed by the same artists.


 Download free score. Buy parts. Flute Mystery Op.66a [Alto flute version]

Download free score. Buy parts. Flute Mystery Op.66b [C flute version]

Download free score. Buy parts. Flute Mystery Op.66c [Flute and Piano (Piano Reduction for rehearsals]


 

Emily Beynon, flute
Catherine Beynon, harp
Philharmonia Orchestra
Vladimir Ashkenazy

Flint Juventino Beppe, composer
Nominated for a Grammy Award in 2010 in the category Best Surround Sound Album
Flute Mystery Op.66 is dedicated to Sir James Galway
Flute Concerto No.1 Op.70 is dedicated to Emily Beynon
Cat. No. 2L-58-SABD, Digital Album, 2-disc Hybrid SACD & CD + Audio Blu-ray, FJB 50


Flute MysteryAlbum Page
FLUTE MYSTERY is released on label 2L in collaboration with Symbiophonic.

2L Album Page
2L Album Page
2L emphasize immersive audio with Pure Audio Blu-ray and Hires file distribution.

 

[...] Beppe writes music of a spare beauty. The 15-minute, one-movement piece merges cool restraint and rhythmic exactitude. Galway, to whom Beppe dedicated the score, played his languid lines with sympathy and dark polish.
Washington Post, October 6, 2006

First performed in the Kennedy Center, Washington D.C. on the 5th of October 2006 by Sir James Galway and the National Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leonard Slatkin. The same program also performed the 6th and 7th of October.

Program note from the Kennedy Center: National Symphony Orchestra: Leonard Slatkin, conductor/Sir James Galway, flute, performs Mozart Oct. 5 - 7, 2006

Version for C flute first performed in 2008 by flutist Judith Hall, harpist Willy Postma and the Pluri_Art Orchestra, conducted by Viacheslav Valeev. UK premiere and album release in 2009 by flutist Emily Beynon, harpist Catherine Beynon and the Philharmonia Orchestra, conducted by Vladimir Ashkenazy.








Flute Mystery Op.66b — the title track of this recording — is another example of a calm, enchanted work in which the sounds of conventional instruments meld together to produce a fascinating new entity. Just listen to the first few cautious notes, orchestrated as unison between flute and harp; they reach out beyond our everyday lives to a timeless realm which supports the entire work. From a technical point of view Beppe's music is governed by an unfailing, intuitive understanding of the instruments' physiology and the distinctive auditory character and potential of the ensembles; however it is never the craftsmanship which comes first in his music — it is the overall artistic flow. This work also exists in a version for alto flute (Op.66a).

Wolfgang Plagge, professor










 






Two very important factors that have always fascinated me deeply are Nature and Space; their influence is felt in many of my compositions. The title Flute Mystery represents a subjective reference to these abstract elements that surround us all the time. Hence Flute Mystery is based on personal feelings and moods encompassing these factors (among others). The alto flute part has both tranquil passages and others of greater intensity, combining here and there with the sympathetic input of harp and strings. It is a symphonic poem, written in a single movement, but with various tempi and dynamic markings.
Flint Juventino Beppe


Flute Mystery Op.66b — the title track of this recording — is another example of a calm, enchanted work in which the sounds of conventional instruments meld together to produce a fascinating new entity. Just listen to the first few cautious notes, orchestrated as unison between flute and harp; they reach out beyond our everyday lives to a timeless realm which supports the entire work. From a technical point of view Beppe's music is governed by an unfailing, intuitive understanding of the instruments' physiology and the distinctive auditory character and potential of the ensembles; however it is never the craftsmanship which comes first in his music — it is the overall artistic flow. This work also exists in a version for alto flute (Op.66a).
Wolfgang Plagge, professor



Watch a special video edition of Flute Mystery Op.66b



Special video edition made by
BPanhter




FLUTE MYSTERY — Flint Juventino Beppe
Emily Beynon, flute
Catherine Beynon, harp
Philharmonia Orchestra
Vladimir Ashkenazy
Nominated for a Grammy award in 2010
«Flute Mystery» Op.66 is dedicated to Sir James Galway
Cat. No. 2L58SABD


    




Relevant links



Obtain sheet music for «Flute Mystery» Op.66a

Obtain sheet music for «Flute Mystery» Op.66b

Program note Kennedy Centre


Complete flute repertoire


Order Flute Mystery SACD & Blu-ray


Download cover booklet (eBook)


«Flute Mystery» Op.66a world premiere

Memorable premiere with Beynon, Ashkenazy & Philharmonia Orchestra




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